All About Buckwheat

Buckwheat is such an amazing and nutritious grain. It’s easy to digest, versatile, and gluten-free. Buckwheat is not a cereal grain but a fruit seed that is related to rhubarb. It is high in rutin, a plant nutrient that helps the body lower overall lipid profiles, thus reducing cholesterol. It is also high in magnesium, which relaxes smooth muscle, lowers blood pressure, and supports balanced blood sugar. Buckwheat is high in insoluble fiber, which is excellent for colon cleansing and can reduce gallstone production as well.

I love cooking with buckwheat groats and flour because they have such a nutty flavor and can be added to soup, baked into bread or biscuits, or enjoyed as a morning porridge. Here are some recipes to inspire you.

Savory Buckwheat Bread

You will need:

  • 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour

  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

  • 1 teaspoon each thyme and coriander

  • 1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar

  • ¼ cup olive oil

  • 1 cup water

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.                                           

Grease a loaf pan with olive oil.

Combine all ingredients and stir until thoroughly blended.

Pour batter into greased pan and bake for 30 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center tests clean.

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SWEET Buckwheat Bread

You will need:

  • 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour

  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

  • a pinch of salt

  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom

  • 1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 1 cup milk (almond, rice, or cow)

  • 1 cup frozen or fresh blueberries

  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (optional)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.                                           

Grease a loaf pan with olive oil.

Combine all ingredients and stir until thoroughly blended.

Pour batter into greased pan and bake for 30 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center tests clean.


Buckwheat Cauliflower Casserole

 You will need:

  • 1 cup dry kasha (toasted buckwheat groats)

  • 2 ½ cups water

  • ½ teaspoon each: salt, coriander, nutmeg

  • 1 large head cauliflower (about 2 cups chopped)

  • 3 medium carrots (about 2 cups chopped

  • ½ teaspoon each: salt, coriander, nutmeg, cinnamon

Place kasha and water in a stock pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer, and cook, uncovered, for 15 minutes until kasha begins to thicken.

Add spices.

 Stir vigorously until grain reaches porridge-like consistency. Set aside to cool for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Chop cauliflower into florets. Chop carrots into crescents.

Oil a rectangular baking dish with olive oil.

Add carrots and cauliflower to the baking dish.

Season with spices.

Toss well to coat. Roast for 30 minutes.

Remove from oven and reduce heat to 350 degrees.

Remove cauliflower and carrots from baking dish and set aside in a bowl temporarily.

Cover the bottom of the baking dish with a thin layer of cooked kasha. Cover kasha with the vegetables. Cover vegetables with the rest of the cooked kasha.

Bake for 15 minutes, cool and enjoy!

Kasha Biscuits

You will need:

  • 3/4 cup cooked kasha

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 1/4 cup flaxseed meal

  • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice

  • 1/4 teaspoon each: salt and nutmeg

Place ½ cup dry kasha (buckwheat groats) and 1 ½ cups water in a stock pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer, and cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes or until kasha begins to thicken.

Stir vigorously until grain reaches porridge-like consistency. Set aside to cool for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

In a bowl, mix olive oil, nutmeg, salt, and flaxseed meal.

Incorporate the cooled kasha and then the lemon juice.

Drop mix in heaping spoonfuls on a greased baking dish.

Bake for 20 minutes, or until the edges have turned dark brown. Let cool before serving.

 Raw toasted buckwheat groats (kasha)

Raw toasted buckwheat groats (kasha)